Veal and Vegetable Ragout

IMG_7182b

I remember the first and last time I bought ground beef in Bangladesh.  Diplomatic housing was isolated in two neighborhoods outside of Dhaka city center, most likely for safety reasons.  Access to butchers, fishmongers, supermarkets and fresh vegetables was limited and unsatisfactory.

IMG_7170b

Comfortable with shopping in West African open markets, I decided to hop in the car with a friend and my driver (right hand drive) and explore Dhaka’s downtown market area.  The driver dropped us off at one of the gates to the central farmers’ market and left to park the car.  No exaggeration, we were in the market for about 3 minutes when the gate was slammed and we were in the middle of a full scale, bullet flying riot.  The full story is best told with numerous glasses of wine but it involved a daring rescue and 5 hours of body guarding by my surprisingly belligerent driver in a market tea shop.  Gasuddin; I’ll never forget him.  Last time I went to town.

IMG_7225b

But I was talking about ground beef.  So, the Dip neighborhood business sections included rows of tiny shops that sold everything from cloth to automotive parts.  I found a “butcher”  and squeezed into the shop.  Having reviewed my market Bangla (Bangladesh language), I was able to order a kilo of ground beef.  The smiling and friendly butcher chose a likely looking piece of beef and handed it to a little man standing at the side of the counter.  The little man retrieved a well-used, not too clean cutting board and knife, took everything outside to the sidewalk, squatted and began to mince the meat with the knife, occasionally swatting off a plague of flies.  Oh-My-God!  And it took a really long time, with the outside temperature akin to a wet and dripping hell.  This is why most foreigners do not go shopping but send the cooks and insist that all food is cooked until it is unrecognizable.  So what did I do?  For three years,  1) I never went shopping.  2) I never went in the kitchen while food was being prepared, preferring to give orders from the door and “step away”.  3) We ate out a lot and I averted my eyes when passing by the restaurant kitchen.  Sort of miserable for an enthusiastic cook but nothing lasts forever and we were never sick, although many Americans were :(

Now that I think of it, I have some really good Bangladeshi stories like “Gasuddin and the Rickshaw Driver”.  Next time.  I’ve got to finish this post and practice my accordion :D

I bought some mah-velous, grind while you watch, ground veal from the pristine hands of the butcher at Leclerc while I was in France.  So that’s why.

IMG_7209b

Veal and Vegetable Ragout

4-5 cloves of fresh garlic, sliced

3 small or 1 big onion, sliced

1 yellow bell pepper, cut into chunks

3 tbsp olive oil

1 lb ground veal

1 aubergine, cut into chunks

2 courgettes, cut into chunks

1/2 lb mushrooms, halved

2 tbsp fresh basil, chopped

1 tbsp fresh oregano, chopped

Salt and pepper

1 can diced tomatoes

Saute the garlic, onion and bell pepper in the olive oil until the onions are just soft.  Add the veal and continue to saute until the meat is no longer pink.  Add the aubergine and saute for 3 minutes.  Add the courgettes and saute for another 3 minutes.  Add the mushrooms and saute for 2 minutes.  Add the basil, oregano, salt, pepper and tomatoes, blending well, then simmer for about 5 minutes or until the vegetables are tender but still firm.

About cookinginsens

An American living in Burgundy, France
This entry was posted in American, Cooking, Food and Wine, Main dishes, Recipes, Vegetables and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

32 Responses to Veal and Vegetable Ragout

  1. fionaward says:

    What a great story! I love veal, but probably not bought from there!

    • I don’t believe the Bangladeshis would kill a calf. There’s more money per pound selling older animals. Another funny thing is that many of the cows in Bangladesh are acquired by midnight raids on neighboring, cow worshiping but not eating India :)

  2. Really interesting piece there Rosemary, especially the butcher ‘experience’. Amazing!

    Love veal but so hard to come by here. Good looking dish.

  3. Great looking ragout, Rosemary. I love veal, but is a little pricey!

  4. What a funny butcher story, I have to admit I completely go by the motto, what you don’t know won’t hurt you’ and it is so relevant in this butcher case. Just don’t look hehe

  5. Pingback: BLOG DO SARAIVA: Tucano pagará R$ 2,5 mi para receber um treino da seleção | SCOMBROS

  6. Good Cooks says:

    Good looking dish, like the variety of vegetables you used.

  7. What an amazing story, Rosemary. Yes, buying meat in other parts of the world can be a harrowing experience. Probably why so many animals are sold live . . . In any case, glad to hear that you made it out safely. What a driver!

    • I’m just glad we made it out Daisy :) Not one of our favorite places but we did have good friends in ex-pat community. There’s always something good about a place.

  8. Wonderful and beautiful!

  9. trixpin says:

    Wow, that’s a stunner of a story! I don’t know if I’d rather have cooked the food myself just to make sure it was completely done, or if I’d have just done what you did…
    This dish looks very yummy!

  10. Michelle says:

    I love your stories. “Step away.” Priceless.

  11. Caroline in San Francisco says:

    I’d love to consume “numerous glasses of wine” with you and listen to your adventures. You should write a memoir!

  12. I agree with Caroline in San Francisco! A memoir in your future! Your ragout looks fantastic Rosemary. I bet that Miller Genuine Draft was a good pairing!

  13. Carole says:

    Hi Rosemary, Carole’s Chatter is collecting veal dishes today. This is a nice one. I do hope you pop over and link in. This is the link . Cheers

  14. Bassa's Blog says:

    You tell a great story. I hope this will be a frequent feature of your posts.

  15. Tessa says:

    I love the story Rosemary! Great veal and vegetable ragout!

  16. Fiona says:

    I just made this for lunch and it was DELICIOUS!! Thank you!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s